More Deaconess materials online!

Thanks to our beloved friend Wayne Kempton, Archivist of the Diocese of New York, and to the Christoph Keller, Jr. Library of the General Theological Seminary, we offer you this link to the “Newsletters of the Church Training and Deaconess House (1891-1938) and St. Mary’s House – Philadelphia Divinity School (1938-1952) now associated with Windham House in New York.”

The PDFs are made available to you through the Keller Library, and the originals are safely kept in the hallowed rooms of the Archives of the Diocese of New York. Click through and find out more about these amazing women and what they accomplished. Here’s a sample from the May 1957 newsletter, describing one member of the class of 1905:

MARY HARRIMAN, worked first as a missionary to the Indians in Minnesota, and then for awhile at St. Mark’s-in-the-Bowerie, in New York. Then she had charge of an orphanage near Concord, N.H., which she modernized. Then she married Mr. Dole and had two daughters. When the children were older she became a teacher in Connecticut for handicapped children and carried this work on successfully and with deep devotion until her retirement. Her years were then spent in travel first all over this country and then to the Orient by a freighter, and then to Africa. She had written a book which gave her money for these extended trips. She died on February 10th, 1955.

 

2 Comments

  • I am so very glad Wayne decided to do this! We had a brief conversation about this when I visited the Archives in my capacity as archivist for the Association for Episcopal Deacons, after he emailed about finding some artifacts that had belonged to Dncss. Gillespie who lived at Diocesan House (formerly the building that housed the New York School for Deaconesses) I had used the materials in this collection when I did my research on NY deaconesses for my MA thesis at GTS.

    I am excited to share this information with the diaconal community and hope to uncover more of the history of these hardworking and interesting women.

  • Thank you Mary and Wayne for getting this information into the Ethernet! As one who has studied the deaconesses in NY, I am ever thankful to you both for this link. In my capacity as Archivist of the Association for Episcopal Deacons, I will be sharing this valuable information with our growing diaconal community.

So, what do you think?